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Magazines Make Great Gifts for Every Occasion

You have a lot of special people in your life. Treat them with a specially selected magazine subscription that will entertain, inspire and educate with the news and topics that matter most in their lives! From friends to family, co-workers to neighbors, a magazine subscription makes the perfect holiday gift for everyone—it’s one size fits all!

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Magazine News Year in Review 2013

Top Magazine Stories of 2013

Magazine News Year in Review 2013The more things changed for magazines in 2013, the more they stayed the same. Several celebrated major milestones, some went digital-only, and one notable title announced its intent to return to print.

Another year in the magazine industry marked another year of changes. More magazines went digital, more made adjustments because of the changing nature of magazine readership.

But as much as digital made its mark on magazines in 2013, several other developments should be taken as proof that those traditional print editions aren’t going anywhere anytime soon. So with 2014 just days away, we take a look back at some of the top headlines in the magazine industry of the past year.

1. More Magazines Go Digital: In 2013, we said goodbye to several magazines in their printed form, like Whole Living in January and PC World in August. Perhaps none made bigger headlines than Newsweek, which started the year in its new all-digital form. By the end of the year, Newsweek’s new ownership announced it would be bringing the print magazine back in early 2014.

2. Everyday Food Supplement Debuts: Martha Stewart’s beloved digest-sized food magazine, Everyday Food, became a digital casualty of late 2012. Fans were promised it would live on online and in quarterly supplements to Martha Stewart Living subscribers. The first debuted in February.

3. Magazines Get a Makeover: Every year, we can usually count on a few titles to make a few tweaks in their look, but it’s rarely happened to The Atlantic. In March, the monthly unveiled a bolder cover look, a redesigned table of contents, and more engaging layout changes. Reader’s Digest debuted its makeover with its January 2014 issue (already on newsstands), and Popular Science will follow suit in February 2014.

4. More Female Writers Get Recognition: The National Magazine Award nominations were kinder to female writers and reporters this year. Half of the field of 34 awards finalists were women, compared to just seven of 24 a year ago. Women received recognition in each of the 23 awards categories, after being shut out of four in 2012.

5. Magazine Readership Posts Solid Numbers: Digital has long been thought to spell the end of printed magazines, but numbers released in May showed a 3 percent increase in readership—helped in part because of tablet editions. Among the more popular genres are magazines devoted to diet, fitness, and mental well-being.

6. New York Magazine Awarded Cover of the Year: New York Magazine’s Hurricane Sandy cover image titled “The City and the Storm” took top honors in the American Society of Magazine Editors “Cover of the Year” contest. The post-Sandy image captured the city that never sleeps in half-darkness.

7. Multiple Magazines Mark Milestone Anniversaries: 2013 was a banner year for major celebrations for major magazines. National Geographic marked its 125th anniversary in October with a special issue devoted to photography. Time celebrated its 90th anniversary in February, while Esquire turned 80 in October. Just more proof of the longevity of the printed word.

8. Time Inc. Unveils New Subscription Model: Starting with PEOPLE magazine in September, Time Inc. debuted its new subscription packages. The publisher offers traditional print-only or digital-only subscriptions, or print-plus-digital offerings for readers who want a taste of both.

9. Nancy Gibbs Makes Magazine History: Her byline has been attached to well over 100 cover stories of the venerable newsweekly, but Nancy Gibbs made magazine history in September when she was named Time magazine’s first female managing editor.

10. New York Magazine Scales Back: The longtime weekly magazine that covered the Big Apple announced earlier this month that it would cut back to bi-weekly production. Citing the higher costs of production and diminishing print ad revenues, the magazine said it would scale back its printed issues and also invest in its online presence as its digital ad revenues continue to rise.

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“On the Cover of the Rolling Stone”: Magazines in Music

playlist_rollingstone_300.jpgHow are magazines playing an informative, entertaining role in the world of music? Check out our playlist of songs inspired by magazines.

Music is certainly well represented in the magazine world. But how about the reverse? How are magazines–those publications that can play such an informative, entertaining role in our lives–represented in the world of music?

Quite well, in fact. A search of lyrics on the website songmeanings.net brings up 50 pages–nearly 1,000 songs–that mention the word “magazine” in some manner. There was even a band named Magazine, an influence on the likes of Radiohead, Morrissey and U2.

If you’re looking to stock up your iPod with some magazine-related tunes, the following list–by no means comprehensive, nor intended to be–will get you off to a solid start.

“Vogue” by Madonna (1990)
The Material Girl not only name-checks (indirectly) one of fashion’s most recognized magazines in this song’s title, she also confirms just how important magazine covers are as taste-makers and definers of beauty.

Greta Garbo, and Monroe
Dietrich and DiMaggio
Marlon Brando, Jimmy Dean
On the cover of a magazine

“Cover of the Rolling Stone” by Dr. Hook and the Medicine Show (1972)
Songwriter Shel Silverstein took a lighthearted shot at the rock ‘n’ roll lifestyle–the groupies, the drugs, the limos and more–in the verses of this song while simultaneously celebrating what most musicians would see as career peak in the catchy chorus:

Rolling Stone
Wanna see my picture on the cover
Rolling Stone
Wanna buy five copies for my mother
Rolling Stone
Wanna see my smilin’ face
On the cover of the Rolling Stone

Incidentally, the song’s performers, Dr. Hook and the Medicine Show, were featured on Rolling Stone magazine‘s cover on March 29, 1973, a few months after the song’s release. Country legend Buck Owens recorded a re-worked version in 1974 titled “On the Cover of the Music City News.”

“Billionaire” by Travie McCoy (2010)
This reggae-styled pop/rap track has recently been making a name for itself on Billboard magazine’s Hot 100 and Pop charts. A parental advisory warning is in order for a few F-bombs and more, but no one can deny McCoy’s logic that you’ve truly reached billionaire status when you’re “on the cover of Forbes magazine / Smiling next to Oprah and the Queen.”

“Cover of a Magazine” by Deana Carter (2003)
This country artist, who had a runaway hit with “Strawberry Wine,” tackles a variety of magazine-related subjects in this song: body image, advertising and consumerism, and what magazines are best at–escapism (“For $2.99 you get to sink your hooks / In the lives of heroes, in the lives of crooks”). Yet the ultimate goal remains being a glamorous cover model herself.

“Centerfold” by J. Geils Band (1981)
“I’ll Wait” by Van Halen (1984)
“Cover Girl” by Cheap Trick (1985)

This rock ‘n’ roll triumvirate of prurient obsession with female magazine models offers insight into what was on guys’ minds in the early ’80s–and just about every other time period before and since. J. Geils Band best sums up the stereotypical male’s powerlessness against the draw of certain come-hither covers at the newsstand: “Oh no, I can’t deny it / Oh yeah, I guess I gotta buy it!”

“The Girl on the Magazine Cover” by Richard Beavers (1948)
This oldie, written by celebrated composer Irving Berlin and sung by Richard Beavers in Berlin’s 1948 musical “Easter Parade”–starring Judy Garland and Fred Astaire–is essentially the G-rated, gentlemanly version of Cheap Trick’s “Cover Girl.” Somehow I doubt Berlin’s line “It seems they painted her just for me” packed the same punch in its heyday as Cheap Trick’s “Biting her lips, shaking her hips / You know she looked so fine” did in ’85.

“In This Skin” by Jessica Simpson (2003)
Serving as an antidote and response to the ogling, scrutinizing nature of the previous four tracks, this cathartic song showcases Simpson trying to learn to be happy with herself, ultimately ignoring the expectations and pressures imposed by others.

They see me in a magazine
I’m the one they want to be
Still don’t feel I’m good enough
Still don’t feel I’m thin enough

“Bennie and the Jets” by Elton John (1973)
Featuring what is easily the most famous four-syllable pronunciation of “magazine” (MAG-uh-zah-EEN), this enduring hit includes a discussion among friends who become hip to a new female-fronted musical act (and attitude) through word-of-mouth and magazine coverage.

Oh but they’re weird and they’re wonderful
Oh Bennie she’s really keen
She’s got electric boots, a mohair suit
You know I read it in a magazine

“The Way We Get By” by Spoon (2002)
This superb rock tale of disaffected youth confirms, like “Bennie and the Jets,” the role of magazines as a herald of new trends: “We found a new kind of dance in a magazine / Tried it out, it’s like nothing you ever seen.”

“A Magazine Called Sunset” by Wilco (2003)
In a testament to the power of magazines, like music, to become intertwined with memories and emotions, the band Wilco taps into the spirit of a publication that captures the inspiration and imagery of the Western United States: Sunset magazine.

There’s a magazine called Sunset
And a tape machine that won’t let
Me ever forget this impossible longing for you

Have a favorite magazine-related song that didn’t make this list? Let us know about it in the comment section below.

 

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Save Up to 85 Percent During the Magazines.com Cyber Monday Sale

Save big while playing Santa for everyone on your shopping list. Get select customer favorites at great prices during our Cyber Monday Sale!

No need to brave the crowds today, as online deals abound on Cyber Monday 2012. During this more convenient extension of the Black Friday shopping frenzy, you can score deep discounts, free shipping and more, all from the comfort of your computer.

At Magazines.com, our Cyber Monday Sale features savings of up to 85 percent on 15 of our customer favorites. Today only, get a one-year subscription for yourself—or everyone on your “nice” list—for less than $10 on most magazines.

Our Cyber Monday Deals apply to these magazines on the list below:

Car & Driver                    12/$6.99          (reg. 12/$12)
Country Living                 10/$6.99          (reg. 10/$12)
Elle                                12/$6.99          (reg. 12/$14)
Elle Décor                       10/$6.99          (reg. 10/$6.99)
Road & Track                  12/$6.99          (reg. 12/$12)
Popular Mechanics          12/$6.99          (reg. 10/$12)
Seventeen                       12/$6.99          (reg. 12/$10)
Oprah                               6/$6.99          (reg. 12/$18)
Cosmopolitan                  12/$10             (reg. 12/$15)
Esquire                           11/$5.99          (reg. 11/$8)
Good Housekeeping         12/$5.99          (reg. 12/$7.97)
Marie Claire                     12/$5.99          (reg. 12/$10)
Redbook                          12/$5.99          (reg. 12/$8)
Woman’s Day                  12/$5.99          (reg. 12/$10)
US Weekly                      52/$47.08        (reg. 52/$67.08

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Christmas in July $1 Sale: Turn a Dollar into a Magazine for Everyone on Your List

Get more bang for your buck with our $1 Sale, where more than 50 magazines are just $1 or less per issue. Stock up on your favorite titles for you—or everyone on your list.

There’s not much a dollar can buy these days—save for the specially-priced items at any fast-food establishment or discount stores with the price advertised in the name. It’s even more difficult to something for a dollar that lasts longer than just a short period of time.

But that’s not the case with the Christmas in July $1 Sale! For a limited time, more than 50 magazines are on sale for just $1 or less per issue. And there’s something for everyone on your holiday shopping list—or just for you.

Any of these subscriptions could make great stocking stuffers your recipient can look forward to every month. Or pair them with complementary gadgets or items to make great gifts—for Christmas or any other occasion.

Here’s a preview of the titles on sale and the type of person they’d appeal to.

For Fashion Lovers: Get your glam on with haute titles like InStyle, Marie Claire and Nylon covering the latest trends from head to toe.

For Parents: Turn to titles like Parents, Parenting Early Years or Parenting School Years for kid-friendly activities and advice for any age.

For Thrillseekers: Feed your need for freedom on the open road or on the water through magazines like Motor Trend, Motorcyclist or Sail.

For Entertainment Junkies: Get the news on every reality TV show to the latest summer blockbuster with TV Guide and Entertainment Weekly.

For News Buffs: Can’t get enough of the day’s latest headlines? Titles like Time and Newsweek delve deeper into politics, global issues and more.

For Businessmen (or Women): Stay on top of the business world outside of the boardroom with Fortune, Forbes or Bloomberg BusinessWeek.

For Outdoorsmen (or Women): Be prepared for the big game in the field or the big catch on the water with titles like Field & Stream or Outdoor Life.

For Sports Nuts: Go in-depth on your favorite sports, news and rumors with subscriptions to Sports Illustrated, ESPN The Magazine or Sports Weekly.

For Techies: Geek out with the latest gadgets with titles like Popular Science, Laptop Magazine or Connected World.

For Artists and Dreamers: Learn to express yourself creatively with magazines like Outdoor Photographer, Making Music or Poets & Writers.

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The 10 Best Magazines to Curl Up With for Great Reads

No time to delve into a good book? No problem. These well-written magazines can be squeezed into the busiest of schedules to satisfy the great read you’re craving.

Sure, you’d love to spend a lazy afternoon getting lost in your favorite book or the latest bestseller. But either there’s not enough time or you can never get more than a few pages or chapters in before an interruption permanently takes you away.

Don’t think you have to give up leisurely reading altogether. Turn to these ten magazines to soak in their longer-form writing that’s still short enough to fit into the busiest of schedules. It’s the next best thing to reading a great book.

The Atlantic: Every page of this magazine is well-written, but the features on the latest social issues—like the effects Facebook has on us, changes in autism diagnoses or whether women can have it all—are the real gems.

Sports Illustrated: Even if you’re not a sports fan—but especially if you are—you’ll appreciate the well-written attention given to topics like agents paying players, Tuscaloosa’s devastating tornadoes and Title IX 40 years later.

Saveur: You’ll want to eat up this delicious writing that explores simple pleasures at home and exotic locales and cuisine abroad. It’s travel-meets-food in its best page-turning—and low-cost getaway—form.

National Geographic: Best known for its breathtaking photos, this magazine’s articles on sociological topics—like the impact of dying languages—and others with an environmental and scientific focus are written just as well.

EatingWell: As if the healthy recipes and nutrition news weren’t reason enough to read, features like the conglomeration of dairy farms and abundance (and health benefits) of salmon put this magazine over the top.

Garden & Gun: This Southern Living-meets-Oxford American publication explores everything Southern through the written word of some of the region’s best writers like Rick Bragg, Roy Blount, Jr., and Winston Groom.

Time: This news magazine provides thoughtful and thorough examinations of the latest political issues like healthcare and changes in international governments, as well as a healthy dose of culture, travel, food and sports.

Smithsonian: There’s a reason it was voted the most interesting magazine in America. Covering a little of everything—history, psychology, medical research, sports—and excellent writing surely had something to do with that.

Wired: Not just for techies, this magazine’s great writing on provocative and timely subjects like hurricane hunters, Olympic athletes and the latest in movies and TV are sure to please anyone looking for an interesting read.

Rolling Stone: If you dig that hip rocker vibe, you’ll enjoy reading it too. This magazine exudes cool in every way—including its writing on politics, social issues, music, television, video games and more music.