Tag Archives: Food Network Magazine

Family 4th of July

Let Freedom Ring With These 4th Of July Favorites

[two_fifth]cherry blueberry pie recipe[/two_fifth]

Are you ready for the most patriotic day of the year? Whether you have a fully planned 4th of July event or still have more on your holiday to-do list than you would like to admit, add a little more red, white, and blue to your weekend with these American themed cooking and decorating ideas!

What is more American than apple pie? Red, white, and blue-themed cherry and blueberry pie! Try a twist on an American classic for an easy, delicious Independence Day dessert. Whether you are cooking for a potluck or a small event with family and friends, this mouth-watering recipe from Food Network Magazine is sure to please everyone. Preparation time is only 20 minutes, and Food Network Magazine gives this treat an “easy” level rating.

 

What You Need:

Pies:

  • 1 package double pie crust mix
  • 1 (20-ounce) can cherry pie filling
  • 1/2 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice
  • 2 tablespoons milk
  • 2 teaspoons sugar

Blueberry Sauce:

  • 1 pint fresh blueberries, reserve 1/4 cup for garnish
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 2 tablespoons water
  • 2 cups vanilla ice cream

What You Do:

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.
  2. Prepare pie crust according to package directions. Divide into 6 equal portions, roll into balls and refrigerate covered for at least 1 hour. On a lightly floured surface, roll each into a circle about 1/4-inch thick.

For Pies:

  1. Place each of the rolled out circles onto the baking sheet. Divide cherry pie filling into the center of each of the 6 pie crusts and sprinkle each with the pumpkin pie spice. Fold the edges of the pie dough over the cherry pie filling, making sure to leave the center of the pie exposed. Place a few of the reserved blueberries on top of each pie. Brush the sides of the pies with milk and sprinkle with 2 teaspoons of the sugar. Place pies in the oven and bake for 30 minutes, or until crust is golden brown and filling is bubbling. Remove from oven and allow to cool slightly.

For Blueberry Topping:

  1. In a medium sauce pan over medium heat, stir together blueberries, sugar, and two tablespoons water. Bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer for 10 minutes. Turn off the heat and allow to cool to room temperature.
  2. To serve, place 1 warm pie on 6 plates, top each pie with a scoop of vanilla ice cream and a generous drizzle of the blueberry sauce.

 

[one_third]Fireworks Display[/one_third]

 

Sometimes a delicious dessert alone is not enough. Go the extra mile with tasteful red, white, and blue DIY decorations! BrightNest’s DIY patriotic firework placemats are a simple, quick way to add a nice touch to your 4th of July event.

 

 

What You Need:

  • White, beige, or light-colored fabric placemats
  • Red and blue fabric paints
  • A kitchen scrub brush
  • A paper plate
  • Water for rinsing the kitchen scrub.

What You Do:

  1. Pour a quarter-sized amount of red fabric paint onto a paper plate; repeat for blue paint.
  2. Dip the scrub brush bristles one of the colors of paint and firmly press the bristles into the fabric to start making your design.
  3. To create the appearance of fireworks, alternate and overlap paint colors. Make sure to rinse the kitchen scrub in water between alternations to avoid overly blending your colors.
  4. Let the placemats dry in a safe place and – voila! You have your own patriotic placemats.

Tip: Want to add a little more flair to your fireworks? Use a second, smaller kitchen scrub to create smaller fireworks!

As you prepare for an all-American celebration full of potlucks, get-togethers, fireworks shows, and more, these quick Independence Day extras will add a little more bang to your weekend. Have a fun and safe 4th of July, and remember those who sacrificed for our freedom.

If you want more easy DIY decoration ideas, check out http://bit.ly/1o7EWSd. Have any other 4th of July cooking or decorating ideas? Feel free to share them below in the comments section.

 

“Interwoven as is the love of liberty with every ligament of your hearts, no recommendation of mine is necessary to fortify or confirm the attachment.”

– George Washington in his Farewell Address

Oscar After Party_featured

A Culinary Sneak Peek Into the Academy’s Official Party

Oscar After PartyWhen does the food prep start? What happens to the unserved food? Food Network Magazine dishes out the details of the Governors Ball, Hollywood’s premier after-Oscar party.

With the Academy Awards tonight, the next big event after the stars walk the red carpet and the golden statues are presented is the all-important after party.

While movie buffs and perpetual party planners were busy working on creative themes and menus of their own, Food Network Magazine went behind the scenes of one of the biggest parties in Hollywood.

Renowned chef Wolfgang Puck is the culinary mastermind behind the popular Governors Ball, the after-Oscar event that hosts 1,500 celebs and other hot shots. Puck has already been at work for several weeks preparing for the star-studded event.

According to the timeline he provided to Food Network Magazine, the menu has long been set, as it’s something he starts thinking about around six weeks before the show. Though Puck is making more than 50 dishes, you can bet mini kobe burgers, smoked salmon and gold-covered chocolate Oscars will be among them—those are served every year.

As you might imagine, when you’re serving 1,500 dinner guests, there are a lot of special requests ranging from vegetarian to gluten-free to raw to vegan. But with a crew of 300 sous chefs from his restaurants, plus culinary students from L.A., the gang’s got it all covered.

The cooks get started early—around 6 a.m.—on the day of the show and continue their preparation while watching a live feed of the ceremony. That’s so they can synchronize having the hot dishes on the table just before the glammed-up guests arrive.

Once the celebs move on to the next venue, the food served at the Governors Ball doesn’t just go to waste. Instead, it’s given to Angel Harvest, a non-profit organization that disperses the unserved leftovers among soup kitchens and shelters to help feed the community.

Not until this last generous duty is complete does Puck afford himself his only luxury of the evening. When he can finally relax, he toasts a job well done with a glass of champagne and calls it a night.

 

Valentines Day Desserts_featured

5 (Fairly) Easy Desserts to Impress Your Sweetheart on Valentine’s Day

Valentines Day DessertsWant to do something sweet (literally) for your sweetie? Whether you’re at ease in the kitchen or just learning your way around, try your hand at one of these heartwarming desserts.

You can earn a lot of brownie points for the effort put forth in making something homemade this Valentine’s Day.

Thankfully, there’s plenty of inspiration to be found in this month’s food and cooking magazines with recipes inspired by everything from the traditional sweet staple (chocolate) to the popular color of the season (red).

Even if you’re crunched for time or want to slowly test the waters, these five fairly easy Valentine’s Day desserts will help you impress your sweetheart with your thoughtfulness.

Chocolate-Cinnamon Pudding, Taste of the South: Pudding isn’t just for kids anymore, not with this dressed-up version topped with chocolate shavings and cinnamon sticks. You’ll have to use the stovetop to make this dessert—no instant shortcuts here—so if you can manage that, you can pull this one off. But, judging by the photo, it looks like it’s worth the risk.

Valentine Sorbet Sandwiches, Everyday Food: A lighter, heart-healthier version of the ice cream sandwich, this treat makes use of sorbet that’s store-bought for a time-saving bonus. The cookie part of the sandwich is made from scratch but isn’t too complicated for a curious or experienced baker to pull off. Some may want to have a store-bought backup just in case.

Red Velvet Cheesecake, Food Network Magazine: This incorporates (almost) all you need for a perfect night: chocolate, red velvet and decadent cheesecake. The magazine says this recipe clocks in at a little over 30 minutes of active preparation, but you’ll want to keep in mind that you’ll have to chill this treat for at least four hours before you can slice and serve.

Strawberry Jam Cake, Cooking With Paula Deen: This fresh confection is perfect for the person who’s not much of a chocolate fan. The light cake gets its berry flavor from strawberry jam spread between its layers, which are then topped with a frosting that incorporates fresh berries. This one’s a little higher on the difficulty level but definitely not impossible.

“Puppy Love” Cherry Crunchies, Every Day With Rachael Ray: You read that right. If the love of your life (at least right now) is your four-legged friend, remember him or her this Valentine’s Day with these dog biscuits flavored with dried cherries. Bonus points for using heart-shaped cookie cutters when cutting out the dough. But either way, your pooch will love you.

Sandra Lee Semi-Homemade

Sandra Lee Magazine: Making the Case for (Another) Heavily-Marketed Title

Sandra Lee Semi-Homemade magazineFirst comes the brand, then the magazine, which is successful as a result. Sandra Lee will be the latest to provide insight into what works in the modern publishing world.

Semi-homemade sensation Sandra Lee is set to launch a new magazine—much to the chagrin of some—after her Sandra Lee Semi-Homemade was shuttered in January. The replacement title, Sandra Lee, is set to make its debut later this month on Oct. 30, 2012 with a focus on “living well,” which will cover everything from cooking, entertaining, fashion and style.

While today’s ever-changing, ever-transitioning print world and an already-crowded mix of food and lifestyle magazines may seem an inopportune environment to start anew, there’s a case to be made for Sandra Lee, the magazine.

Sandra Lee won’t be your typical magazine start-up. By partnering with firmly entrenched TV Guide Magazine, this new title will have plenty of financial backing and cross-promotion that will lend it some measure of success.

That won’t change the fact that it will enter a flooded market segment, but its performance should provide some insight into what works in the modern publishing world. Already, titles like Food Network Magazine have flourished, thanks to the support of a successful cable channel and plenty of celebrity starpower behind it.

After the runaway success of Food Network Magazine, publisher Hearst launched HGTV magazine last year. It, too, has the luxury of an established network and popular designers, but time will tell if the success of Food Network Magazine can be replicated in another category.

In a similar vein, but on a smaller scale, was Sandra Lee Semi-Homemade. Lee gained notoriety as a QVC host, then transitioned to Food Network, where she shared her “semi-homemade” meals concept, using a mix of pre-packaged items and fresh ingredients.

Like it or not, magazines may not survive on content alone, and this part marketing/part editorial approach could be the new future of print holding on in an increasingly digital world. Which brings up an interesting point about Sandra Lee magazine—no print subscriptions will be sold, but it will be available in digital editions and on newsstands for $6.99 each per issue.

So let Sandra Lee join the long list of the food and lifestyle titles out there, even if it’s just for the sake of gauging whether a magazine’s success can be bought with enough high-profile  names or heavy-hitting support behind it—or whether any case can be made that content is still king.

Skewers on the Grill

The 10 Best Magazines for Great Grilling Recipes and Advice

Whether you’re a grill master or an aspiring one, you’ll find all the tools of the trade and plenty of recipes to make while honing your skills in these ten magazines.

Grilling season may unofficially run from Memorial Day to Labor Day, but don’t think you have to have to put away the grill and tongs just yet. Fall is the perfect time to keep it burning!

The weather’s nice and cooler, plus what goes hand in hand with tailgating better than breaking out the grill?

Whether you’re watching the game from your own luxury suite at home or you’re traveling to support your favorite team, you’ll need plenty of good recipes and advice to try something new or hone your skills, if even just a little.

These are the ten best magazines for tips, shortcuts and recipes for any occasion or meal, so don that apron and fire up the grill!

1. Food Network Magazine: Every issue contains pointers from the network’s celebrity chefs, including grill master Bobby Flay.

2. Southern Living: In the South where football is nearly akin to religion, this magazine reveres the tailgate. In fact, check out its recently published Official SEC Tailgating Cookbook too, which is packed with spirited treats prepared on and off the grill.

3. Cooking Light: Enjoy the fruits of the flame even by cutting back on calories, fats and more, all while searing in good—and good-for-you—flavor.

4. Every Day With Rachael Ray: An all-grilling issue is published in the summer, but Rachael’s still got great advice and recipes to share year-round.

5. Food & Wine: If you want to go beyond the grilling basics—chicken, beef and pork—you’ll find tips for preparing other meats, like lamb, here.

6. Cook’s Illustrated: Marinade not sticking? Meat overdone? This in-depth how-to publication explains what’s going wrong—and how to make it right.

7. Everyday Food: Throw the whole meal on the grill, including simple and flavorful sides often found in this magazine.

8. Taste of Home: Don’t forget dessert! Fruits like peaches can be prepared over the open flame to complement a main dish, enjoy as an in-season appetizer or after-dinner treat.

9. Clean Eating: Vegetarians and carnivores alike will find palatable recipes in this healthy publication. Think everything from grilled Portobello burgers to grilled shrimp skewers.

10. Whole Living: Turn here for tips on preparing the healthiest of grilled fare while being mindful of your environmental footprint. For example, opt for charcoal rather than using lighter fluid as it’s easier on the ozone. Same goes for fabric napkins and sturdy plastic flatware—over just tossing the cheaper versions after one use.

1382058_20697850_chef_featured

The 10 Best Magazines to Keep in the Kitchen

Make sense of everything that goes on in your kitchen with these must-have magazines. You’ll never have to wonder what to cook or how to store, budget or plan ahead again.

There’s a seemingly endless list of dilemmas we face in the kitchen—from how to best store fresh produce to organizing grocery lists and preparing healthy, but quick (of course) meals. Often, the answers to these culinary conundrums come a little too late—if we’re even aware to seek them out at all. But that’s exactly why these ten magazines made our list of must-haves in the kitchen.

Cook’s Illustrated: Even if the trial and error behind each recipe doesn’t interest you, the double-page spread of reader-submitted tips is packed with enough useful storage, organization and prep advice to make this worthwhile.

Everyday Food: This Martha Stewart publication not only makes the grade for its very convenient size, but also for its in-season profiles and multiple recipes in every issue that help you get the most out of  the freshest fruits and veggies.

Cooking Light: Lighter eating doesn’t have to mean blah. Not with these made-over meals that trim the fat and calories from foods you’ll actually want to eat. Budget-conscious beer and wine pairing advice and recommendations included.

Family Circle: Who isn’t trying to feed a family on a budget these days—much less trying to make it healthy, fast, tasty and exciting? It may sound impossible, but these recipes cover a lot of ground for less—and even break down the cost per serving.

Every Day With Rachael Ray: Take that budgeting and meal planning a step further with Rachael’s weeknight planner, shopping list and projected grocery bill in each issue. You’ll never get halfway through a recipe and realize you forgot an ingredient.

Food Network Magazine: Your favorite cooking celebs bring out the fun in food with creative presentation and recipes “copied” from famous restaurants. Each issue’s tear-out booklet features 50 variations on one food, like milkshakes, burgers and more.

EatingWell: Snacking can be the slippery slope that derails the best of us when it comes to healthy eating. Not so with these low-fat, low-cal treats that include everything from cookies and pies to prepared fruits and, yes, even cheesecake.

Vegetarian Times: Even if your diet isn’t meat-free, these recipes are worth having on hand for any guests—or for incorporating a vegetarian night into your own regimen. Regardless, it’s a great resource for hearty salads and sides.

YUM Food & Fun for Kids: Banish summer boredom or come to the rescue on rainy days with nutritious snack ideas and creative desserts kids can help make themselves. Your little ones will be well-fed—and entertained.

Cookbook Digest: Cookbook addicts, this is for you—one way or another. This magazine previews new cookbooks and lets you “try” multiple recipes before you buy, meaning you may add less—or more—to your collection.